N.C. Wesleyan College instructor Sherry Holland, front row, left, stands with Ethics Bowl participants, back row, from left, Timothy McDonald Jr., Isaiah Morrow, Jared Johnson, Kaitlyn Paige Price, and front row, on right, Alexis Robinson.

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N.C. Wesleyan College instructor Sherry Holland, front row, left, stands with Ethics Bowl participants, back row, from left, Timothy McDonald Jr., Isaiah Morrow, Jared Johnson, Kaitlyn Paige Price, and front row, on right, Alexis Robinson.

N.C. Wesleyan students participate in Ethics Bowl

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Four N.C. Wesleyan College students took part in the N.C. Independent Colleges and Universities’ fifth annual Ethics Bowl held Feb. 5-6 at Meredith College in Raleigh.

The students who represented Wesleyan were Isaiah Morrow, a senior biology major from Chapel Hill; Jared Johnson, a junior business administration and accounting major from Rocky Mount; Timothy McDonald Jr., a junior religious studies major from Durham; Kaitlyn Paige Price, a junior psychology major with a minor in criminal justice and sociology from Rocky Mount; and Alexis Robinson, a junior theatre, sociology and criminal justice major from Rocky Mount.

Sherry G. Holland, a Wesleyan computer information systems instructor and 2004 Wesleyan graduate, served as the team coordinator.

“This was the first event these students have participated in,” Holland said, “and each of them needs a round of applause. The students competed in four competitions. They lost the first one, but after it settled in that they had lost their first round, they regrouped, reflected back on the things the winner had done differently, and then they went and competed in three other rounds and won each.

“Although they didn’t make it to the finals, each student walked away with pride for what they had accomplished, and they have already started discussing things they want to do differently next year!”

Twenty-two colleges and universities from throughout North Carolina participated in the event, which focused on the theme of Ethics in Technology. Teams advanced to the semi-finals after accumulating the most wins in four rounds of competition. The topic for the semifinal case was “Civil Disobedience, Free Speech, and Technological Protest Against Questionable Practices.” The teams responded to the question: “Is it ethical to hack and publish documents deemed by the hacker to reveal immoral, unethical, or illegal activity?”

The topic for the final round was “Artificial Intelligence, Military Intelligence, and Robotic Warfare.” The question posed to the teams was: “Is remote-controlled warfare more ethical than conventional warfare?”

Judges for the competition included business and community leaders. They praised the teams for their thoughtful arguments and broad knowledge of the topics. Barton College was the first-place winner, with Methodist University placing second.

“The Ethics Bowl participants get stronger every year,” said Hope Williams, president of NCICU. “This is such a valuable experience for these students. Not only does it increase awareness and discourse among students and business and community leaders, but the months of preparation strengthen all the students’ academic endeavors.”