Scout pushes bounds with Eagle project

CHICAGO – David Fite already had earned the 21 merit badges needed to earn the coveted rank of Eagle Scout. But he still had to complete a community service project.

  • App interest outweighs romance

    NEW YORK – Online dating services are now hip with young adults, but not always for dating.

  • Readers are sure to have good stories to share

    I’ve recently received a couple of interesting letters from 86-year-old Bess Thibault.

  • Traffic can drive you to distraction

    The weather folks on the television and in the newspaper all predicted foul weather, rain, sleet, snow and low icy temperatures.

  • Program brings more than music to tough prison

    BISHOPVILLE, S.C. – One of South Carolina’s most dangerous prisons also is home to beautiful music, occasions when gate alarms and tower sirens are replaced by guitar riffs, beat box rhythms and the strains of Vivaldi.

  • Question response can haunt students

    They are basic yes-no questions that ask whether a college applicant ever got into trouble in high school.

Readers are sure to have good stories to share

I’ve recently received a couple of interesting letters from 86-year-old Bess Thibault.

  • Monday is just for Español

    We’re a motley crew: different ages, races, male and female, some employed and others retired.

  • Our state deserves earliest caucus date

    Here’s what I want to know: Who decided that Iowa always gets to go first?

  • I’m all about the Panthers

    For me, the main attraction of Super Bowl is usually a party where I can yak with the other wives while eating chili and hot wings, pausing long enough in these girly gabfests to watch the over-the-top commercials and the halftime extravaganza.

  • Busy, busy toddler is a handful of fun

    I haven’t checked recently to see what pre-school teachers and day care workers earn annually, but unless it’s in the six figures, it’s not enough.

  • Lottery winners see downside of jackpot

    The mega excitement is over. The winning numbers have been guessed.

Traffic can drive you to distraction

The weather folks on the television and in the newspaper all predicted foul weather, rain, sleet, snow and low icy temperatures. This was the outlook for several days, and it came to pass.

  • City should stake a claim to fame

    The News & Observer recently had an article in which it designated Cary as the grocery capital of the Research Triangle.

  • Birthday rekindles winter memories

    I had a birthday recently that resulted in a number of cards that I enjoyed reading.

  • Lawyers chew the fat at monthly meal

    On a specified day in each month, a group of old and retired lawyers meet for lunch at a local restaurant.

  • Dark time yielded to warm holiday

    I was thinking about the good times we had during the Christmas season when we were small children.

  • Bugle resonates as a holiday gift

    I still remember my most favored Christmas present from childhood. We were living in Palmyra at the time, and I was a Boy Scout in Troop 150 centered in Hobgood.

Music shields an often turbulent life

You don’t have to be a fan of Carly Simon and her music to enjoy this heartfelt story of love, love lost and fame in her compelling, frank and often poetic memoir.

  • Roosevelt was a loving – and tough – father

    Understanding Theodore Roosevelt’s relationship with his children, especially his youngest son, Quentin, tells us something about the ambitious, blustering, larger-than-life, former president that we might have missed in the myriad biographies on countless bookshelves.

  • Fugger’s efforts help define capitalism

    Perhaps calling him “The Richest Man Who Ever Lived” (Simon and Schuster; $27.95) might be a bit of a stretch, but Greg Steinmetz writes that by the time of his death in 1525, Jacob Fugger’s self-made fortune amounted to more than 2 percent of all of Europe’s gross national product.

  • Tiny jurist packs outsized influence

    ‘Notorious RGB” (HarperCollins, $19.99) begins as a celebration of Ruth Bader Ginsburg as a personality, but it also covers the past five decades that showcase how different America has become for women, in part because of the work the U.S. Supreme Court associate justice has done on their behalf.

  • Brown unravels centuries-old mystery

    In the 1830s, on a remote beach in Northwest Scotland, 92 carved ivory chess pieces were found along with the buckle of the bag that once contained them.

  • Con man walked away with millions

    In an enthralling account of the life, times and crimes of Leo Koretz, author Dean Jobb brings to life the deeds of a master swindler, hedonist and womanizer against the backdrop of the Roaring Twenties in Chicago.